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The Vietnam War And International Law, Volume 3

RRP $250.00

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Issues of the war that have provoked public controversy and legal debate over the last two years--the Cambodian invasion of May-June 1970, the disclosure in November 1969 of the My Lai massacre, and the question of war crimes--are the focus of Volume 3. As in the previous volumes, the Civil War Panel of the American Society of International Law has endeavored to select the most significant legal writing on the subject and to provide, to the extent possible, a balanced presentation of opposing points of view. Parts I and II deal directly with the Cambodian, My Lai, and war crimes debates. Related questions are treated in the rest of the volume: constitutional debate on the war; the distribution of functions among coordinate branches of the government; the legal status of the insurgent regime in the struggle for control of South Vietnam; prospects for settlement without a clear-cut victory; and Vietnam's role in general world order. The articles reflect the views of some forty contributors: among them, Jean Lacouture, Henry Kissinger, John Norton Moore, Quincy Wright, William H. Rhenquist, and Richard A. Falk.

Originally published in 1972.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.


Software And Internet Law

RRP $614.99

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Among the first casebooks in the field, Software and Internet Law presents clear and incisive writing, milestone cases and legislation, and questions and problems that reflect the authors' extensive knowledge and classroom experience. Technical terms are defined in context to make the text accessible for students and professors with minimal background in technology, the software industry, or the Internet.

Always ahead of the curve, the Fourth Edition adds coverage and commentary on developing law, such as the Digital Millennium Copyright Act's Safe Harbor, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, and the Stored Communications Act.

Hard-wired features of Software and Internet Law include:

  • consistent focus on how lawyers service the software industry and the Internet
  • broad coverage of all aspects of U.S. software and internet law;with a focus on intellectual property, licensing, and cyberlaw

The Fourth Edition responds to this fast-changing field with coverage of :

  • the Digital Millennium Copyright Act's Safe Harbor
  • the Electronic Communications Privacy Act
  • the Stored Communications Act
  • Hot News; Misappropriation
  • Civil Uses of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act


Criminal Law & Procedure

RRP $13.99

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*Includes a table of contents The United States has one of the most technically sound criminal justice systems in the world. Mostly derived from English common law, the U.S. Constitution explicitly lays out when and how a citizen can be searched and arrested, as well as their other rights to trial. But, as with many of the Constitution's powers, the experiences of the colonists at the hands of the British shaped our legal system's criminal procedure laws. Like most of American jurisprudence, American criminal law is rooted in the early American settler's experience with British law. In fact, when Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence and listed the "repeated injuries and usurpations" of the British monarchy, he named no less than five alleged offenses implicating the criminal justice system. Jefferson noted the King had "refus[ed] his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers," and he had "made judges dependent on his will alone." Jefferson also accused the British of conducting "mock trials" to protect their own soldiers who had committed crimes against the colonists, while depriving colonists of the rights to a trial by jury of their own peers. Criminal procedure is a subset of constitutional law that focuses on the procedures by which authorities investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate crimes. Criminal procedure rules frame the behavior of police, prosecutors, and judges when they seek to apprehend, charge, and convict those suspected of committing a crime to ensure that the suspect's constitutional rights are protected. After the colonists won the American Revolution, the Framers set about creating a Constitution that addressed all of these issues. Most of them are addressed in the 4th-8th Amendments of the Constitution. The 4th Amendment prohibits practices such as the writs of assistance by requiring probable cause for warrants, while the 6th and 7th Amendments protect against mock trials by requiring impartial juries and other trial rights. The Constitution also grants defendants the right of habeas corpus, which allows anyone charged with a crime to demand that the evidence against him be produced. However, time and circumstances change. In the 18th century, the Framers rode carriages to Philadelphia, not cars. Authorities had less reason to worry about dangerous weapons that could be hidden in coat pockets. As a result, American courts have had to apply the Constitution to new technology and circumstances beyond what the Framers could have possibly envisioned while drafting the Constitution. Today Americans are familiar with many of the Constitution's protections because they have been inundated with television shows about crime dramas. Many people can state the "Miranda Warning" by memory, a warning totally alien to the Framers. This book comprehensively covers the history and evolution of criminal law and procedure in America.


Automotive Painting Technology

RRP $354.99

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This book offers unique and valuable contributions to the field. It offers breadth and inclusiveness. Most existing works on automotive painting cover only a single aspect of this complex topic, such as the chemistry of paint or paint booth technology. Monozukuri and Hitozukuri are Japanese terms that can be translated as "making things" and "developing people" but their implications in Japanese are richer and more complex than this minimal translation would indicate. The Monozukuri-Hitozukuri perspective is drawn from essential principles on which the Toyota approach to problem-solving and continuous improvement is based. From this perspective, neither painting technology R&D nor painting technology use in manufacturing can be done successfully without integrating technological and human concerns involved with making and learning in the broadest sense, as the hyphen is meant to indicate. The editors provide case studies and examples -- drawn from Mr. Toda's 33 years of experience with automotive painting at Toyota and from Dr. Saito's 18 years experience with IR4TD, the research-for-development group he leads at the University of Kentucky -- that give details on how these two principles can be integrated for successful problem-solving and innovation in industry, in university R&D, and in the collaboration between the two.

The book will bring readers up to date on progress in the field over the last decade to provide a basis for and to indicate fruitful directions in future R&D and technology innovation for automotive painting.


The Duty To Obey The Law

RRP $266.99

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The question 'Why should I obey the law?' introduces a contemporary puzzle that is as old as philosophy itself. The puzzle is especially troublesome if we think of cases in which breaking the law is not otherwise wrongful, and in which the chances of getting caught are negligible. Philosophers from Socrates to H.L.A. Hart have struggled to give reasoned support to the idea that we do have a general moral duty to obey the law but, more recently, the greater number of learned voices has expressed doubt that there is any such duty, at least as traditionally conceived.



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